My Dentistry Blog

Posts for: July, 2018

By Colonial Dental Group
July 22, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
ChrissyTeigensTeeth-GrindingTroubles

It might seem that supermodels have a fairly easy life — except for the fact that they are expected to look perfect whenever they’re in front of a camera. Sometimes that’s easy — but other times, it can be pretty difficult. Just ask Chrissy Teigen: Recently, she was in Bangkok, Thailand, filming a restaurant scene for the TV travel series The Getaway, when some temporary restorations (bonding) on her teeth ended up in her food.

As she recounted in an interview, “I was… like, ‘Oh my god, is my tooth going to fall out on camera?’ This is going to be horrible.” Yet despite the mishap, Teigen managed to finish the scene — and to keep looking flawless. What caused her dental dilemma? “I had chipped my front tooth so I had temporaries in,” she explained. “I’m a grinder. I grind like crazy at night time. I had temporary teeth in that I actually ground off on the flight to Thailand.”

Like stress, teeth grinding is a problem that can affect anyone, supermodel or not. In fact, the two conditions are often related. Sometimes, the habit of bruxism (teeth clenching and grinding) occurs during the day, when you’re trying to cope with a stressful situation. Other times, it can occur at night — even while you’re asleep, so you retain no memory of it in the morning. Either way, it’s a behavior that can seriously damage your teeth.

When teeth are constantly subjected to the extreme forces produced by clenching and grinding, their hard outer covering (enamel) can quickly start to wear away. In time, teeth can become chipped, worn down — even loose! Any dental work on those teeth, such as fillings, bonded areas and crowns, may also be damaged, start to crumble or fall out. Your teeth may become extremely sensitive to hot and cold because of the lack of sufficient enamel. Bruxism can also result in headaches and jaw pain, due in part to the stress placed on muscles of the jaw and face.

You may not be aware of your own teeth-grinding behavior — but if you notice these symptoms, you might have a grinding problem. Likewise, after your routine dental exam, we may alert you to the possibility that you’re a “bruxer.” So what can you do about teeth clenching and grinding?

We can suggest a number of treatments, ranging from lifestyle changes to dental appliances or procedures. Becoming aware of the behavior is a good first step; in some cases, that may be all that’s needed to start controlling the habit. Finding healthy ways to relieve stress — meditation, relaxation, a warm bath and a soothing environment — may also help. If nighttime grinding keeps occurring, an “occlusal guard” (nightguard) may be recommended. This comfortable device is worn in the mouth at night, to protect teeth from damage. If a minor bite problem exists, it can sometimes be remedied with a simple procedure; in more complex situations, orthodontic work might be recommended.

Teeth grinding at night can damage your smile — but you don’t have to take it lying down! If you have questions about bruxism, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Stress & Tooth Habits” and “When Children Grind Their Teeth.”


By Colonial Dental Group
July 20, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Root Canal  

Root CanalCould your aching tooth be restored by this endodontic procedure?

Have our Glenview, IL, dentists, Dr. Alexander Quezada and Dr. David Lewis Jr., told you that you need a root canal? If so, you may be wanting to do as much research as possible to find out more about this procedure and why it’s necessary. You may even have questions, which we would be happy to answer for you. Here is everything you need to know about your upcoming dental procedure.

Why do I need a root canal?

Beneath the hard enamel and dentin layers of a tooth lies an inner structure known as the dental pulp. The pulp is made up of connective tissue, blood vessels, and nerves. Are you experiencing a toothache? This could just be because the bacteria have spread to the dental pulp, causing it to become inflamed and resulting in a toothache.

Once the pulp is inflamed or infected the only course of action that can be taken is for our Glenview, IL, dentist to remove the pulp as soon as possible. This is where a root canal comes in. During your root canal we will drill into the tooth (don’t worry; we will numb the area prior so you won’t feel discomfort) and then carefully remove the pulp.

From there, we will disinfect the inside of the tooth to remove any bacteria that is left. Once that is complete, it’s time to start restoring the tooth. A special material will be used to fill the root canals (to prevent another infection), as well as the inside of the tooth (to re-strengthen and stabilize it). From there, our dentist will determine whether a filling or a crown will need to be placed over the tooth to restore it.

What are the warning signs that I might need a root canal?

It’s important that you understand what’s going on with your oral health so that you can take action when it’s necessary. Sure, some problems won’t cause symptoms at all, so you may not even know that anything is going on. This is why those routine checkups with your dentist every six months are crucial, even if you think everything feels fine and dandy. Only a dentist can detect early signs of decay, gum disease, and infection.

Of course, you should call us right away if you experience,

  • Dental pain (no matter how minimal)
  • Pain that appears or gets worse when chewing or biting down
  • Swollen, red, or tender gums surrounding the tooth
  • Sudden tooth sensitivity to hot or cold
  • Darkening of the tooth
  • A bump or pimple-like growth on the gums near the tooth (a sign of infection)

If you are dealing with dental pain or if there are other changes in your oral health it’s a good idea to turn to our Glenview, IL, dental team to find out what’s going on. Call Colonial Dental Group and let us know what’s going on and we will get you in to see our dentist as soon as possible.


GoodReasonsforChoosingClearAlignersforOrthodonticTreatment

If your teenager is in need of orthodontic treatment, you might automatically think braces. But while this decades-old appliance is quite effective, it isn’t the only “tooth movement” game in town any more. Clear aligners are another choice your teenager might find more appealing.

Clear aligners are a sequential set of computer-generated plastic trays that are worn by a patient one after the other, usually for about two weeks per tray. The trays are fabricated using 3-D computer modeling of the patient’s mouth, each one slightly different from the last to gradually move teeth to the desired new positions.

So, why choose clear aligners over braces?

They’re nearly invisible. Because they’re made of a clear polymer material, they’re not nearly as noticeable as metal braces. In fact, they may go completely unnoticed to the casual observer.

They’re removable. Unlike metal braces, which are fixed in place by an orthodontist, clear aligners can be removed by the wearer. This makes brushing and flossing much easier, and they can also be removed for eating or special occasions. That said, though, they should be worn at least 20 to 22 hours each day to be effective.

They’re becoming more versatile. With some complicated malocclusions (poor bites), braces and other orthodontic appliances may still be necessary. But innovations like added power ridges in clear aligners can more precisely control which teeth move and which don’t. This has greatly increased the number of poor bite scenarios where we can appropriately use clear aligners.

If you’d like to consider clear aligners, just remember they require a bit more self-discipline on the part of the wearer than braces. And once the treatment finishes, they’ll still need to wear a retainer just as with metal braces to help keep the repositioned teeth from reverting to their old positions.

If you think your teen is up to the challenge and their particular situation can be corrected with this innovative technology, then clear aligners could be a great choice.

If you would like more information on clear aligners orthodontic treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Clear Aligners for Teens.”


By Colonial Dental Group
July 01, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
HowLongWillRootCanalTreatmentLast

Root canal treatment can be an effective life preserver for a heavily decayed tooth. The question a lot of people ask, though, is how long might the tooth survive after treatment.

That’s an important concern since the treated tooth was in dire straits beforehand as decay had infected its inner most layer, the pulp. The infection, which had caused the living bundles of nerves, blood vessels and connective tissue within to become inflamed and diseased, was poised to invade even deeper through the root canals. During the root canal treatment, the infected pulp tissue is removed and the empty chamber and root canals are filled with a special filling to seal the tooth from further infection.

The protection, though, isn’t an absolute certainty: how long a treated tooth survives depends on a number of factors. For one, the earlier a diseased tooth can be initially diagnosed — especially if the infection hasn’t spread into the jawbone — the better the procedural outcome. Likewise, the chances of longevity are also better if the initial root canal treatment was thorough in identifying and filling all the root canals as well as capping the tooth with a life-like crown in a timely manner after treatment.

The type and location of the tooth can also affect its long-term health. Front teeth, with their single roots and canals are easier to access and treat. Back teeth, by contrast, can have two or more roots and a more intricate canal network. These kinds of complications could require the use of special microscopic equipment and the expertise of an endodontist, a specialist in root canals.

Even if a re-infection occurs, the tooth isn’t necessarily lost. A repeat root canal treatment that addresses these and other issues, could give the tooth a “third” chance. In any case, if a tooth is worth saving attempting a root canal treatment is generally preferable to losing the tooth and replacing it with a prosthetic tooth — it’s well worth the try.

If you would like more information on root canal treatments, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Root Canal Treatment: How Long Will it Last.”